Focus: The North Carolina General Assembly

Understanding North Carolina's state legislature
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The North Carolina General Assembly – our state legislature – is divided into two chambers. The State House of Representatives is made up of 120 representatives, and the State Senate has 50 senators.
Both chambers have a Republican majority. Republicans have controlled both chambers of the state legislature since 2011.

NC House

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Republicans: 71 seats

Democrats: 49 seats

NC Senate

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Republicans: 30 seats (supermajority)

Democrats: 20 seats

Election maps

All state lawmakers are elected from district boundaries drawn by the majority party in the legislature. These are the current maps for the state House and Senate that were used for the 2022 elections onward. (Read more background on how these maps were drawn.)

Don’t know who your legislators are? Find out today by entering your address here.

NC House

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Click the map above to see a larger version (PDF), or review the interactive version with precinct-level data here.

NC Senate

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Click the map above to see a larger version (PDF), or review the interactive version with precinct-level data here.

Most legislative elections are not competitive.

Across all 120 State House and 50 State Senate elections in North Carolina, only 25 were decided by 10 points or fewer in the 2022 election: 17 races in the House, and 8 in the Senate. This means that 85% of all the seats in the state legislature were decided by more than 10 points, and thus not typically considered competitive.

This is partly due to “political geography” – the tendency of all voters to live in areas where people vote like they do. But it is also due to political gerrymandering engineered to deliver a Republican majority.

Those interested can refer to this full spreadsheet list of current members of the North Carolina House and Senate, including their districts’ approximate partisan lean. This reflects a composite of these districts’ partisan performance from 2016, 2018 and 2020 (note – not 2022) elections.

Link to full Google sheet

Help build progress for North Carolina.

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Get in touch
PO Box 452, Carrboro, NC 27510

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